Your gateway to a wide range of natural resources information and associated maps

Victorian Resources Online

Tanjil (Tj)

A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Tanjil- geoArea: 210 sq. km (1.0%)

Tanjil land system occurs on hilly terrain with plutonic and gneissic rocks, mainly in the south-west of the East Victorian Uplands. Ridge-and-ravine topography prevails but there is some rounding of ridge crests. Slopes are steep and moderately long. Areas are similar in geology and topography to Timbarra land system but they are much more humid.

High rainfall acting on granodiorites, granites and gneisses has produced deep soils. Profiles are generally well aggregated, particularly in the upper horizons, and are moderately acidic.

Layered open forest III is most common, with some open forest II on slopes at lower elevations.
A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Tanjil- image
Protected steep slopes with a humid
Eucalyptus regnans (mountain ash) forest

CLIMATE
Rainfall, mean (mm)
Temperature, mean (C)
Seasonal growth limitations

    Annual 900 - 1600; lowest January or February (60 - 90), highest August or October (120 - 150)

    Annual 8 - 12; lowest July (3 - 7), highest February (16 - 20)
    Temperature <10C (av.): April - October
    Rainfall < potential evapotranspiration: February; frequent winter snow
GEOLOGY
Age, lithology

    Palaeozoic granodiorites, granites and coarsely crystalline gneisses
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Landscape
Elevation range (m)
Relative relief (m)
Drainage pattern
Drainage density (km/km2)

    Steep hills with a subdued ridge-and-ravine topography

    260 - 1460
    80 - 300
    Dendritic
    1.5
PRESENT LAND USE
    Mostly uncleared: hardwood forestry (quality variable, some ash and general construction timber); apiculture; small area in Baw Baw National Park

A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Tanjil- csA study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Tanjil- graph

LAND COMPONENT
Percentage of land system
Diagnostic features
1
70
Slopes
2
15
Protected slopes
3
10
Terraces in major drainage corridors
4
5
Minor drainage depressions
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Slope %, typical and (range)
Slope shape
20 - 25, (10 - 60)
Straight
20 - 25, (10 - 60)
Straight
<5, (0 - 10)
Straight but uneven
Variable, (5 - 30)
Concave
SOIL
Parent material
Granodiorite, granite and associated gneiss
Mixed alluvium
Locally derived alluvium and
colluvium
Description
Mainly brown or red, some yellow, gradational, acidic soils; sandy clay
loam to light clay subsoil, usually with fine blocky structure. On
protected slopes topsoil is darker coloured and much deeper
Limited observations — probably
mainly undifferentiated brown
sand
Variable: brown sandy loam to sandy clay loam; high surficial organic matter and very stony in places
Classification
Red, Brown and Yellow Earths, some Yellow Podzolic Soils and Lithosols
Gn2.11, Gn4.11, Gn4.34, Gn4.54, Gn3.74, Um5.52
Alluvial soils
Uc1.44
Brown Earths
Uc6.11
Surface texture
Loamy fine sand to sandy clay loam; sandy loam common
Sand to sandy clay loam
Sandy loam to sandy clay loam
Surface consistence
Friable to firm when moist
-
Friable when moist
Depth (m)
>1.5
>2.0
>2.0
Nutrient status
Low to moderate
Low to moderate
Low to moderate
Available soil water capacity
Moderate; high for more organic soils
Variable, depending on texture
Moderate
Perviousness to water
Rapid
Moderate
Rapid
Drainage
Good
Good
Moderately good
Exposed stone (%)
Generally 0
0
Variable; 0 - 40
Sampled profile number
-
-
-
NATIVE VEGETATION
Structure of vegetation and
characteristic species of
dominant stratum
(+ Predominant species)
Highest elevations — layered open forest III: E. dives, E. delegatensis, E. rubida
Lower elevations — open forest II, III, often shrubby: E. sieberi+, E. cypellocarpa and/or E. obliqua
Open forest III, IV, often layered:
Highest elevations — E. delegatensis
Lower elevations — E. regnans occasionally with E. nitens; E. regnans and/or E. obliqua, E. cypellocarpa; E. sieberi sometimes associated on upper slopes
Open forest III, IV, often layered:
E. viminalis usually predominant; Nothofagus cunninghamii may be associated in higher rainfall areas
Open forest III, IV, often layered or ferny:
Highest elevations — E. delegatensis Lower elevations — E. regnans with or without E. cypellocarpa, E. obliqua, E. rubida; Dicksonia antarctica often present

    Disturbance
    Affected process and trend
    Primary resultant deterioration
    Casual activities
    Primary off-site process
    Form
    Susceptibility of components
    Incidence with components
    Alteration of vegetation:



    — reduction in leaf area, rooting depth and/or perenniality
    Reduced transpiration,
    resulting in:


    a) increased deep
    percolation


    b) increased regolith
    wetness




    Nutrient loss



    Landslip




    Not determined



    12; low




    Not determined



    Uncommon




    Removal of trees



    Accelerated by major disturbance of native vegetation




    Increased movement of water to groundwater; increased base-flow of streams

    Increased sediment load

    Increased exposure of surface soil
    Increased overland flow and soil detachment
    Sheet and rill erosion
    1,2; moderate
    4; very low
    Uncommon
    Clearing, logging, burning, overgrazing, road and dam building and other earth-moving activities, rabbit burrowing, trafficking by stock and vehicles.
    Increased flash flows and sediment load.
    Increased physical pressure on soil
    Increased compaction

    With

    Reduced infiltration
    Structure decline


    Sheet and rill erosion
    1,3; moderate
    2,4; high


    1,2; moderate
    4; very low
    Uncommon



    Uncommon
    Increased trafficking export of organic matter


    As for sheet and rill erosion above
    -



    Increased flash flows
    Increased soil disruption
    Increased soil break-up
    Gully erosion


    Streambank erosion
    1,2,4; moderate


    3; high
    Uncommon


    Uncommon
    As for sheet and rill erosion above

    As for sheet and rill erosion above
    Increased sediment load


    Increased sediment load
    Comments: Local occurrences of rill and gully erosion occur on road batters, log landings and tracks. Good growing conditions result in rapid regeneration of vegetative cover except on exposed sites at high elevations.
Page top