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Nunniong (Ng)

A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Nunniong- geoArea: 98 sq. km (0.5%)

The Older Volcanic flows were mainly valley fills but subsequent erosion has often removed the softer surrounding sediments and left the basalts as cappings on ridges. Such cappings in alpine or subalpine tracts are mapped in Nunniong land system. These areas, which have a relatively flat to gently undulating topography and rocky outcrop at breaks of slope, are usually flanked by the steep slopes and cliffs of the ridge-and-ravine terrain. Concave, treeless plains with central bogs and some small lakes are common, having formed under earlier lacustrine and paludal conditions before competent drainage developed on the lava flows.

A cold climate and high rainfall have combined to produce friable, acidic soils with a high concentration of organic matter in the topsoil and with little textural change down the profile. Soils are generally shallow and basalt floaters are common. Nutrient status is presumed to be moderately high because of the basaltic parent materials.

The dominant vegetation is grassy or shrubby woodland I with tussock grassland on plains of lacustrine origin. Heath and sedgeland occur in seepage areas and, along with Sphagnum, spp. in bogs.
A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Nunniong- image
Wooded, gentle slopes adjacent to a prior lake bed

CLIMATE
Rainfall, mean (mm)
Temperature, mean (C)
Seasonal growth limitations

    Annual 900 - 1600; lowest January or February (70 - 100), highest August or September (150 - 180)

    Annual 4 - 8; lowest July (-2 - 0), highest February (11 - 13)
    Temperature <10C (av.): April - October
    Rainfall < potential evapotranspiration: February; frequent winter snow
GEOLOGY
Age, lithology
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Landscape
Elevation range (m)
Relative relief (m)
Drainage pattern
Drainage density (km/km2)

    Gently undulating plains on residual interfluve basalt cappings

    1040 - 1700
    40 - 160
    Dendritic
    0.4
PRESENT LAND USE
    Uncleared: summer bush grazing of cattle; apiculture (limited); recreation — bushwalking and skiing; small areas in Bogong National Park

        A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Nunniong- csA study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Nunniong- graph

LAND COMPONENT
Percentage of land system
Diagnostic features
1
65
Gentle slopes, rises and flat
areas
2
20
Treeless grassy lower slopes
bordering depressions, often of
prior lakes
3
10
Stony hills, scarps and ravines
4
5
Small lakes; peat bogs, often
drained by small streams;
seepage areas
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Slope %, typical and (range)
Slope shape
5, (0 - 10)
Various; uneven
5, (0 - 15)
Concave
20 - 25, (10 - 40)
Straight or convex
1, (0 - 2)
Straight or concave
SOIL
Parent material
Basalt
Description
Black loam to clay loam merging
into brown loam to clay loam;
shallow
Black organic loam to clay loam
merging into brown loam to clay;
mostly shallow
Black loam to clay loam merging
into brown loam to clay loam;
shallow
Organic remains and alluvium
Shallow black fibrous peat or muck
overlying mineral soil or bedrock
Classification
Lithosols/Brown Earths/Alpine Humus Soils
Um5.51, Um6.12, Um6.41, Gn4.31, Um6.21, Um6.24
Brown Earths/Alpine Humus Soils
Um6.21, Um6.12
Humic Gleys, Acid Peats
-
Surface texture
Loam to clay loam
Loam to clay loam
-
Surface consistence
Soft to slightly hard
Soft to slightly hard
-
Depth (m)
0.2-0.5
0.3-0.9
0- 0.4
1.0-2.0
Nutrient status
Moderate
Moderate
Moderate
Low
Available soil water capacity
Moderate to high
Moderate to high
Moderate to high
High
Perviousness to water
Moderate to rapid
Moderate to rapid
Moderate to rapid
Moderate to rapid
Drainage
Moderately good to good
Moderately good to good
Good
Very poor to poor
Exposed stone (%)
Very variable; 1 - 75
0 - 15
30 - 80
0 - 15
Sampled profile number
-
6
-
-
NATIVE VEGETATION
Structure of vegetation and
characteristic species of
dominant stratum
(+ Predominant species)
Grassy or shrubby woodland I,
occasionally open forest I or II:
E. pauciflora generally
predominant, sometimes with
E. stellulata or E. rubida;
E. nitens occasionally
predominant
Tussock grassland:
Poa spp.
Tussock grassland: Poa spp.
Shrubby woodland I:
E. pauciflora
Shrubby open forest II: E. rubida
Tussock grassland
Bogs with Sphagnum sp., Epacris
paludosa and/or Carex
gaudichaudiana and other
Cyperaceae and Juncaceae

    Disturbance
    Affected process and trend
    Primary resultant deterioration
    Casual activities
    Primary off-site process
    Form
    Susceptibility of components
    Incidence with components
    Alteration of vegetation:


    — reduction in leaf area, rooting depth and/or perenniality
    Reduced transpiration,
    resulting in:

    a) increased deep
    percolation



    b) decreased fog drip


    c) increased rate of snow melt



    Nutrient loss




    -


    -



    Not determined




    -


    -



    Not determined




    -


    -



    Removal of trees




    Removal of trees and understorey

    Removal of trees and understorey



    Increased movement of water to groundwater; increased base-flow of streams

    Decreased base-flow of streams

    Increased spring and decreased summer stream flow

    Increased exposure of surface soil
    Increased overland flow and soil detachment



    Increased frost heave and soil detachment
    Sheet and rill erosion



    Wind, sheet and rill erosion
    1,2,3; low




    1,2,3; low
    Uncommon: locally severe



    Uncommon
    Road, dam building and other earth-moving activities, trafficking by stock and vehicles.

    Removal of vegetative ground cover
    Increased flash flows and sediment load



    Increased flash flows and sediment load
    Increased physical pressure on soil
    Increased compaction

    With

    Reduced infiltration
    Structure decline



    Sheet and rill erosion
    1,2,4; high
    3; moderate


    1,2,3; low
    Uncommon



    Uncommon; locally severe
    Increased trafficking, export of organic matter


    As for sheet and rill erosion above
    -



    Increased flash flows
    Increased soil disruption
    Increased soil break-up
    Gully erosion



    Streambank erosion
    1,2; moderate
    4; low – moderate


    4; moderate
    Uncommon



    Uncommon
    As for sheet and rill erosion above


    As for sheet and rill erosion above
    Increased sediment load



    Increased sediment load
    Comments: Regeneration of vegetative cover is slow and difficult because of the unfavourable climate.
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