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Booran 2 (B2)

A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Booran2- geoArea: 3 sq. km (-%)

Wave action on Lake Wellington has deposited sand on the eastern shore. A low-angle beach has formed there with a beach ridge. now partly reworked by wind into a low, discontinuous, frontal dune and a higher, continuous, rear dune. The rear dune tends to be about 3 times higher than the front dune, but it does not appear to exceed 10 m in height above lake level. To the south of these parallel dunes, near the lake outlet, is a series of relict beach ridges and recurved spits. The swale between the parallel dunes is mostly narrower and drier than the swales between the beach ridges and spits. The area is mapped in Booran 2 land system. In contrast to Booran 1 land system. this was formed in a freshwater environment and is more stable.
A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Booran2- image
The low foredune with Banksia serrata (saw banksia) on the eastern shore of Lake Wellington.
The soils have formed on sands and the reaction is generally slightly acidic to neutral. The dominant well-drained, sandy soils have accumulated a little surface organic matter giving a slight darkening of the topsoil. This appears to he a little more prominent on the beach ridges than on the dunes. The soils are loose, apedal and of low fertility and water-holding capacity. Consequently, they are susceptible to wind erosion and leaching of nutrients. Old blowouts are common in the dunes. The soil of the dry, interdune swale is very similar to that of the dunes. In the wet swales between the beach ridges the situation appears to he very different. Here, shallow peaty topsoils and subsoils of silty and clayey textures have developed. Undifferentiated sands occur on the beach.

The native vegetation is mostly grassy open woodland I or II with closed scrub in wetter swales in the south.

CLIMATE
Rainfall, mean (mm)
Temperature, mean (C)
Seasonal growth limitations

    Annual 500 - 800: lowest January (30 - 50), highest October (40 - 70)

    Annual 14: lowest July (10). highest February (19)
    Temperature <10C (av.): July
    Rainfall < potential evapotranspiration: November – March
GEOLOGY
Age, lithology
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Landscape
Elevation range (m)
Relative relief (m)
Drainage pattern
Drainage density (km/km2)

    Beaches, coastal dunes and beach ridges

    0 - 17
    0 - 10
    Nil
    0
PRESENT LAND USE
    Mostly uncleared: recreation — fishing and shooting: hush grazing of cattle (minor)
    Minor proportion cleared: grazing of beef cattle and sheep on native and improved pastures

A study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Booran2- csA study of the land in the Catchment of Gippsland Lakes - Vol 2 - land system Booran2- graph

LAND COMPONENT
Percentage of land system
Diagnostic features
1
40
Beach
2
30
Low foredune and higher rear dune
3
20
Beach ridges and recurved spits
4
5
Interdune swales (dry)
5
5
Swales between beach ridges and spits (wet)
PHYSIOGRAPHY
Slope %, typical and (range)
Slope shape
3-5,(2-7)
Straight
12-16,(10-25)
Straight (front): concave (rear)
3-5,(0-8)
Convex, concave
<1,(0-2)
Concave
<l.(0-2)
Concave
SOIL
Parent material
Wind-sorted sands of lacustrine origin, probably non-calcareous
Description
Undifferentiated, relatively fine-grained sand
Greyish brown to brown loose sand grading into yellowish brown to brownish yellow sand at depth, slightly acid throughout
Very dark grey to dark greyish brown very friable loamy sand grading into brown to light grey sand subsoil, often neutral
Soils as in component 2
Single observation — black peaty topsoil over grey and yellowish brown mottled, variable textured, alkaline subsoil
Classification
Alluvial Soils
Uc1.21
Siliceous Sands (pale)
Uc1.21
Alluvial Soils,
Siliceous Sands
Uc1.41, Uc1.21
Siliceous Sands (pale)
Uc1.21
Humic Gleys
Um1.41/O
Surface texture
Sand
Sand
Sand
Sand
Peaty loam
Surface consistence
Loose when dry
Loose when dry
Very friable when moist
Loose when dry
Friable when moist
Depth (m)
>2.0
>2.0
>2.0
>2.0
>2.0
Nutrient status
Very low
Very low
Low
Very low
Low
Available soil water capacity
Very low
Very low
Low
Very low
High
Perviousness to water
Very rapid
Very rapid
Rapid
Very rapid
Rapid
Drainage
Poor (high water table)
Good to excessive
Good
Good to excessive
Very poor
Exposed stone (%)
0
0
0
0
0
Sampled profile number
-
-
-
-
-
NATIVE VEGETATION
Structure of vegetation and
characteristic species of
dominant stratum
(+ Predominant species)
Zoysia macrantha, sometimes
with Pteridium esculentum growing higher up the beach
Grassy open woodland I of Banksia integrifolia+ (on deeper sands — mostly dunes in the north)

Grassy open woodland I or II of E. tereticornis+ with or without Banksia integrifolia(on drier spits. beach ridges and swales and lower dunes)
Melaleuca ericifolia dominates understorey on wetter beach ridges and spits and may form closed scrub in wet swales

Disturbance
Affected process and trend
Primary resultant deterioration
Casual activities
Primary off-site process
Form
Susceptibility of components
Incidence with components
    Alteration of vegetation:
    — reduction in leaf area, rooting depth and/or perenniality
    Reduced transpiration, resulting in increased deep percolation and leaching
    Nutrient loss
    1; moderate
    2.3; high
    4; moderate - high
    5; low
    Not determined
    Removal of trees
    Increased movement of water to groundwater.
    Increased exposure of surface soil
    Increased wind velocity over soil and increased detachment of sand
    Wind erosion
    1,2; high - very high
    3; moderate
    4; low
    Common
    Clearing, burning, trafficking by humans and vehicles.
    Encroachment by sand.
    Increased physical pressure on soil
    Increased compaction
    Structure decline
    12,3; very low
    4; low
    5: moderate
    Uncommon
    Increased trafficking
    -
    Increased soil disruption
    Increased loosening of sand
    Wind erosion
    1,2; high - very high
    4; low
    5; moderate
    Common
    As for wind erosion above
    Encroachment by sand
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